Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances

Year: 2007
Volume: 6
Issue: 10
Page No. 1158 - 1166

Lactobacillus casei DSPV 318T Capacity to Colonize and Remain in Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract

Authors : L.S. Frizzo , M.V. Zbrun , E. Bertozzi , L.P. Soto , G. Sequeira , E. Marti , R. Lajmanovich and M.R. Rosmini

Abstract: Probiotics are microbial cells that develop a beneficial effect on the host’s health while passing through the gastrointestinal tract. Their survival rate and persistence in the hosts are important factors when selected to be used like food supplements in animal farms. In the present study, the Lactobacillus casei DSPV 318T capacity to colonize and remain in the mouse gastrointestinal tract was studied. The inoculum was made of Lactobacillus casei DSPV 318T, L. salivarius DSPV 315T and Pediococcus acidilactici DSPV 006T, 3 lactic acid bacteria from bovine origin. The inoculum, with the 3 microorganisms suspended in a NaCl 0.15M solution, was orally administered to an experimental group of mice, by gavages in a 0.1 mL total volume, with a 109 CFU final concentration. One control group only received NaCl solution as placebo. Lactobacillus casei DSPV 318T showed a capacity to remain in a complex ecological niche, such as the mouse intestine, for a longer period of time than the one the treatment lasted. The inoculum administration did not produce any change in the individual activity or appearance, being this an indicator of both, the general state of health and the absence of adverse effects. Followed by doses every other day, the initial massive administration system was efficient considering that such microorganism lodged in the individuals’ intestine. The inoculum did not interfere with the normal functioning of the intestinal microbiota, resulting innocuous to the host.

How to cite this article:

L.S. Frizzo , M.V. Zbrun , E. Bertozzi , L.P. Soto , G. Sequeira , E. Marti , R. Lajmanovich and M.R. Rosmini , 2007. Lactobacillus casei DSPV 318T Capacity to Colonize and Remain in Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract . Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 6: 1158-1166.

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